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Wednesday, February 19, 2020

LESSON 7 – Eliminate Fuzziness Between Board and Staff Roles

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Bill Gruenewald is our guest blogger this week for the third of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools and Templates.”


LESSON 7 OF 40 - Eliminate Fuzziness Between Board and Staff Roles
Keep your leaders on track with a one-page Prime Responsibility Chart.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: In Lesson 7, the authors note that a well-functioning board has clearly defined roles for staff and board members. This one issue clearly contrasts how an effective board functions (versus an ineffective board)—and will keep the organization on the right track to meet its ministry goals.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 7, pages 40-45:
• “ECFA research found the biggest contrast between effective and ineffective boards is the issue of role clarity.”
• “…most boards should relate to one employee: the CEO.”
• “The most important principle: only one person has ‘Prime Responsibility’”…and the Prime Responsibility Chart “is an excellent way to clarify board and staff roles.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
Why is it important to distinguish between staff roles and board roles? If you don’t, the organization will not move forward in meeting its objectives. It is important, at the outset, to determine the board’s roles versus the staff’s roles. The Prime Responsibility Chart (PRC) is a great tool that can be adapted and will work for any organization.

It is important during your board training each year, that the CEO help board members understand their responsibilities and also understand the staff responsibilities of the organization. This is best done when new board members come on the board and also reiterated each year with all board members.

Using the PRC, you will help your board focus on the ministering and monitoring aspect of the work and stay away from the meddling and micro-managing. This will provide for better effectiveness. The PRC is a living document and should be reviewed at least annually. 

I like what Ram Charan said in his book, Owning Up: The 14 Questions Every Board Member Needs to Ask, in the chapter, “How Do We Stop from Micromanaging?” he said:

“Asking questions of an operating nature is not in itself micromanaging, as long as the questions lead to insights about issues like strategy, performance, major investment decisions, key personnel, the choice of goals, or risk assessment.”

The key for highly-functioning boards is to focus on the vision, strategy, and goals—and then empower (and hold accountable) the staff to do the work needed to meet ministry objectives.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY BILL GRUENEWALD:


BILL GRUENEWALD is President-Treasurer of the Tennessee Baptist Foundation in Franklin, Tenn. Bill holds an undergraduate degree in Accounting and Master degrees in Business Administration and Religious Education. He is an ordained minister and has over 25 years in church administration. He is married with one adult son and two grandchildren. 


TO DO TODAY: 
• First, utilize the Prime Responsibility Chart (PRC) provided by ECFA and adapt it to your organization.
• Second, communicate the PRC and make sure all board and staff members understand their roles and responsibilities. 
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 7, “Eliminate Fuzziness Between Board and Staff Roles.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: On 
Feb. 26, 2020, watch for the commentary by Bill Frisby on Lesson 8, “Design Your Succession Plan—NOW! What if your CEO is hit by a bus?”




BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

LESSON 6 – Enhance Harmony By Clarifying Your Participant-Hat Expectations

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Andy Bales is our guest blogger this week for the second of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools and Templates.”

LESSON 6 OF 40 - Enhance Harmony by Clarifying Your Participant-Hat Expectations
Understand the three board hats: Governance, Volunteer, and Participant

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: If you have clear expectations and communications—and an understanding of the 3 board hats: the Governance Hat, the Volunteer Hat, and the “Participant/Fundraising/Friendraising Hat” (my term!)—you will prevent a lot of difficulties and heartache on the staff and board side of things.

The board and staff will be “singing from the same page” and staying in their proper roles and lanes if expectations are communicated clearly and often reiterated.

Direct communication rather than mixed messages, indirect guilt, and shaming will keep an organization out of the fog and divisiveness that often splits an organization or even ends an organization.   

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 6, pages 35-39:
• “Affirming is certainly favored over hinting and whining.” A new board member should know—up front—if hosting a table at a fundraising event is expected as part of being a board member.
• “The best boards customize their own Board Member Annual Affirmation Statement…” (listing expectations). 
• CEOs should make every effort to plan ahead rather than waiting too long and guilting or prodding board members into participating in key events.
• “Guilt and shaming are a poor substitute for clarity and inspiration.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
I’ve experienced the fog of division caused by lack of clarity and defined roles:
• Learning about shadow, unofficial board meetings
• Seeing a board member’s lack of understanding that he or she must only wear the Governance Hat in the boardroom—and not while meeting one-on-one with the CEO or staff
• Cringing when a board member inappropriately wears the Governance Hat at an event—suggesting on-the-spot program changes!

I’ve also hinted and whined or stayed silent—and suffered—rather than planning ahead and clearly communicating Participant Hat expectations about attendance at events. In the absence of clear expectations, I’ve also shared my opinion and/or disappointments about board members.

Recently, I scheduled a meeting with a board member regarding a moment when there was not adequate clarity. I observed this person’s Volunteer Hat drifting into governance territory—and even into the weeds of operations. In the past, I would have hinted and whined and lost sleep! But I’ve learned to speak directly and with clarity one-on-one and now I sleep much better.

I recently taught a class on longevity in ministry. I’ve served 40 plus years, including 34 years in the difficult area of addressing homelessness. For many years, I have suffered by not speaking with enough clarity. I’ve almost left organizations over issues involving board members not staying in their proper lanes or bounds. When we finally clarified roles (example: the three hats), I then chose to finally speak up—and a fog was lifted and I was able to stay.

I would have saved much heartache and had better sleep over the years if I had spoken with the clarity I now speak with. 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY ANDREW BALES:


REV. ANDREW (ANDY) J. BALES has served as President/CEO of Union Rescue Mission of Los Angeles, Calif., since April 2005 and serves on the board of directors of Citygate Network (formerly Association of Gospel Rescue Missions).


TO DO TODAY: 
• Develop a customized Board Member Annual Affirmation Statement for the board of directors.
• Cease hinting and whining and speak directly with truth and love. 
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 6, “Enhance Harmony By Clarifying Your Participant-Hat Expectations.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: On 
Feb. 19, 2020, watch for the commentary by Bill Gruenewald on Lesson 7, “Eliminate Fuzziness Between Board and Staff Roles. Keep your leaders on track with a one-page Prime Responsibility Chart.”
  





BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

LESSON 5 – Dashboards Are Not a Secret Sauce for Sound Governance

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Reid Lehman is our guest blogger this week for the first of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools and Templates.”


LESSON 5 OF 40 - Dashboards Are Not a Secret Sauce for Sound Governance
Too often the use of dashboards does not clearly communicate the past and give signals for the future.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: In Lesson 5, the authors note the importance of a simple, easy-to-understand tool to help the board understand where the ministry is compared to where it should be. First determine Key Performance Indicators for your ministry and how to measure them. Then provide the board with regular data along with context as to what it means, both for those key performance indicators and for the health of the ministry.   

Less is more. The more information you give the board, the less likely the board will be to understand what information is most important. 

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 5, pages 28-34:
• “…a failure to make a conscious decision about what it is we’re going to measure often causes discombobulation and a lack of effectiveness and a lack of achievement.” (Max De Pree)
• “Data requires simplification…and becomes information only when it is shared in context.”
• “Without an effective dashboard, a ministry lacks a fast way to check on the basics so you can spend less time on where you have been and more time on where you are going.”  

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
Why do we bury our boards in so much information? Carver’s Policy Governance™ template specifies that the CEO is not to “present information in an unnecessarily complex or lengthy form.” A recent monthly board packet for a large ministry contained 28 pages—including 10 pages of financial data and 14 pages of program data. There was little context and no indication of what was most important. And, sadly, the agenda contained no important decisions.  

Sharing a lot of information:
Helps the CEO show the board how smart or gifted he/she is.
Convinces the board of ministry complexity and may cause them to doubt their ability to lead.
Is sometimes a way to bury bad news we hope board members won’t notice.
Wastes the board’s time and keeps them from focusing on the few “most-important” things they should be paying attention to. Thus, they squander time on the minutiae of the past instead of focusing on future direction.  

Of the seven dashboard questions suggested by the authors, I’d like to highlight two:
#5. Are we providing the proper level of context? Board members want to focus on what’s most important. Helping them understand key indicators in context helps them to do so. 

#7. Are we using the best dashboard presentation approach for our ministry? If you don’t know how to graphically represent the data best, default to a simple approach with clear indications for whether board action, caution, or celebration may be needed. And remember the title of this lesson. A dashboard doesn’t mean the board governs well, but it does minimize detail so the board can use its time on things that matter.    

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY REID LEHMAN:


Until January 1st, REID LEHMAN was CEO of Miracle Hill Ministries, the largest provider of homeless shelter services in the Carolinas. More than 650 men, women, and children are housed nightly in Miracle Hill’s nine shelters.  

A Policy Governance™ Professional board consultant, Reid has provided board training and facilitation since 1992. He assists Citygate Network by training the boards of rescue missions across the country. Reid and Barbara live in Greenville, S.C. near their five grandchildren.  

TO DO TODAY: 
• Has the board identified its 3-4 key performance indicators (KPI’s) for the ministry? If not, let’s get it on the agenda soon.
• Make sure the board sees its KPI’s at each board meeting, with an understanding of whether the current data is within safe boundaries.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, “Lesson 5: Dashboards Are Not a Secret Sauce for Sound Governance.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On Feb. 12, 2020, watch for the commentary by Andy Bales on Lesson 6, “Enhance Harmony by Clarifying Your Participant-Hat Expectations. Understand the three board hats: Governance, Volunteer, and Participant.”




BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

LESSON 4: Guarding Your CEO’s Soul

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Wes Willmer is our guest blogger this week for the fourth of four lessons in "Part 1: The Powerful Impact of Highly Engaged Boards.”



LESSON 4 OF 40 - Guarding Your CEO’s Soul
Wise boards invest time—up front—to ensure their CEO’s soul is not neglected.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: Boards and CEOs that prioritize soul care will not prevent all crisis situations from happening, but they can, in many cases, help their leaders steer clear of spiritual disasters. In so doing, they also preserve God’s honor and reputation and position the communities they serve for vibrant spiritual growth. 

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 4, pages 20-26:
• Soul care is “the thoughtful and careful attention to the inner being of the individual.” (Jenni Hoag)
• “In many cases, soul care does not make the board agenda until a crisis happens.”
• “As the CEO goes, so goes the ministry. And, as the soul goes, so goes the CEO.” (Stephen Macchia) 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
Perhaps nothing shatters the work of ministry more than the moral failure of a ministry’s CEO. This chapter (interestingly positioned as the fourth of 40 lessons) urges ministry boards to come alongside their CEO—and help guard his or her soul.

I’ve thought a lot about soul care and a leader’s leanings toward or away from God. (Editor’s note: See Willmer’s new book, Stuff and Soul: Mastering the Critical Connection.) The materialistic and sinful desires of the heart can actually be transformed by the Spirit into desire for the things of God. Only God in Christ can by His Spirit infinitely satisfy the longings of our souls. So we must train our souls to recognize this reality.

What can boards do to protect and encourage their CEOs in God-honoring leadership? This lesson lists 10 very practical considerations (guardrails) that should be discussed and reviewed by the board and/or board chair and the CEO. Example: “Encourage the CEO to be at home more nights during the week than out for ministry responsibilities. Ignore this rule at the peril of the organization.” 

A fourth-century Christian pastor and philosopher, Gregory of Nyssa, described the soul’s desires as a river, and at the end of the river is God. Yet channels in the river can divert us from our journey and eventually our desire-river is completely dried up before it reaches God. Board members—also—must model to CEOs that they, too, are on this journey toward God, our Only Hope! 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY WESLEY WILLMER:


WESLEY WILLMER, PhD, CCNL, has served with or for various Christian ministries for five decades and is known as a pioneer among Christian leaders in encouraging Christians to follow God’s plan for money, giving, and asking. Wes has initiated and directed more than $1 million in research grants to study nonprofit practices, and he has been the author, coauthor, editor, or editor-in-chief of over 23 books and many professional journal articles and publications, including: Stuff and Soul: Mastering the Critical Connection (2020), The Prospering Parachurch, Revolution in Generosity, The Choice: The Christ-Centered Pursuit of Kingdom Outcomes, and The Council: A Biblical Perspective on Board Governance. Fund Raising Management magazine selected him to write on the future of funding religion for its twenty-fifth anniversary issue. 

Willmer has held executive leadership positions at Biola University, ECFA, Far East Broadcasting Company, Mission Increase Foundation, Prison Fellowship Ministries, Roberts Wesleyan College, Seattle Pacific University, and Wheaton College (Ill.), and he was a faculty member at each of these educational institutions. His board involvement includes board chair of Christian Stewardship Association, board vice chair of ECFA, founding board member and executive committee member of Christian Leadership Alliance, board member of CASE International Journal of Educational Advancement, and consultant to other boards. 

TO DO TODAY: 
• Discuss with your CEO the 10 steps for soul care listed in this lesson. What is your CEO’s honest self-assessment of his or her spiritual journey? How can the board help?
• Inspire your board to read at least one book on soul care. (See the suggestions in the lesson.)
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, “Lesson 4: Guarding Your CEO’s Soul.”



NEXT WEDNESDAY: On 
Feb. 5, 2020, watch for the commentary by Reid Lehman on Lesson 5, “Dashboards Are Not a Secret Sauce for Sound Governance. Too often the use of dashboards does not clearly communicate the past and give signals for the future.”
  





BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

LESSON 3 – The Productivity Payoff of Intentional Hospitality

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Rick Alvis is our guest blogger this week for the third of four lessons in "Part 1: The Powerful Impact of Highly Engaged Boards.”
THE BELL CURVE OF A BOARD MEETING

LESSON 3 OF 40 - The Productivity Payoff of Intentional Hospitality
Create hospitable and productive board environments. 

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: In Lesson 3, the authors note that it is highly important for a board to get to know one another in order to make board meetings even more productive. Board meetings are likely more productive if board members know where others are coming from.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 3, pages 13-19: 
• When boards fail to take the time and effort to nurture hospitality and a productive environment…mission-focused governance can naturally become lost.
It is important to discern who on your board or staff is specially enabled by God to practice hospitality—use them. 
• Max De Pree: “Many people seem to feel that a good board structure enables high performance. This is simply not so. What’s crucial is the quality of our personal relationships. The [board chair] and the [CEO] set the tone for good relationships….”  

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
Not until I read this chapter had I ever thought about boardsmanship and how it relates to hospitality. Board meetings are for business. In my mind hospitality happened outside the board meeting. Not so. Hospitality can start in the boardroom and hopefully expands further outside the boardroom. Nurturing strong personal relations inside and outside the boardroom is of high importance. This includes working seriously at the growth, needs, and potential of board members—and not just the board members, but the CEO as well. 

Creating an impactful board agenda can keep a board meeting fresh. Unfortunately, some boards have fixed agendas—and don’t you dare challenge it or change it! Max De Pree’s “Bell Curve of a Board Meeting” makes lots of sense. Keeping critical agenda items in the high energy part of the meeting ensures meaningful engagement. We can structure our board meeting agendas more creatively—and thus maximize the time in our meetings when members are most productive.

Saying thanks to the board and practicing servanthood are also of utmost importance. De Pree says it well: “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The second is to say thank you. In between the two, the leader must become servant and a debtor.” Leaders need to remove the cap of arrogance, and instead, wear the cap of humbleness, learner, and servant. 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY RICK ALVIS:

RICK ALVIS is President/CEO of Wheeler Mission Ministries, Indianapolis, Ind. He has served the homeless and addicted for 40 years. He began his career with the Evansville Rescue Mission where he worked for 13 years before coming to Wheeler Mission in 1990. In his tenure in Indianapolis, he has directed a path of growth and outreach to the neediest citizens of Indiana, increasing the number of services offered and extending programs to men, women, and children. Under his leadership, three organizations have merged with Wheeler Mission in order to provide more effective care for Hoosiers in need of vital services. Setting Wheeler Mission on a solid financial path has allowed Wheeler Mission to expand programs and the number of staff by growing a balanced budget from around $650,000 in 1990 to over $15 million in 2019 and an increase in staff from 16 in 1990 to nearly 200 today.

Rick has served Citygate Network (formerly the Association of Gospel Rescue Missions) in several capacities, including Secretary/Treasurer, Vice Chairman, and Chairman of the Board from 2003–2009, the longest serving Chair/President in the Association’s history. He has served on the Board of Directors of ECFA as Secretary and is a 2016 Sagamore of the Wabash recipient.

TO DO TODAY: 
• Review your next board agenda closely. Are you allowing for hospitality, such as providing space for board members to get to know one another? 
• Is prayer just bookends to the meeting? Or, do you pause during the meeting to pray for people, pray for events, and give praise to the Lord for what He is doing through this ministry?
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 3: "The Productivity Payoff of Intentional Hospitality.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: On Jan. 29, 2020, 
watch for the commentary by Wes Willmer on Lesson 4, “Guarding Your CEO’s Soul. Wise boards invest time—up front—to ensure their CEO’s soul is not neglected.”





BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

LESSON 2 – Engage Board Members in Generative Thinking

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Bruce Johnson is our guest blogger this week for the second of four lessons in "Part 1: The Powerful Impact of Highly Engaged Boards.”


LESSON 2 OF 40 - Engage Board Members in Generative Thinking
They rely on generative thinking in their day jobs but are rarely asked to think collaboratively in the boardroom.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: If you were asked to name the three key governance functions of a board, what would be on your list? I doubt “generative” would make your list. It sure wouldn’t have been on mine, but intuitively I knew something like it was important—how to tap the ideas and problem-solving capabilities of board members. Lesson 2 introduces this fairly new concept. See page nine in the book for a clear diagram of the three key governance functions of a board.  

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 2, pages 7-12: 
• Page 10: “…most trustees add too little, too late.” 
• Page 11: “The counterintuitive high value of dwelling on the past, to understand patterns that might impact the future.” 
• Page 12 prayer: “Lord, you have blessed us with amazing men and women who have incredible hearts and minds.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
One of our board members first introduced generative thinking to our SIM USA board. It was an example of generative thinking—bring new thinking and approaches to the table. Generative thinking helps create that kind of culture of contribution within boards.

But let me ask, what percentage of your board meetings are dedicated to idea generation? If we bring people onto our boards because of the value they will bring, why is it we tap into only 50 percent or less of that value? Intentionally weave in generative thinking by dedicating specific time in your board meetings. This will significantly increase member contribution and they will become more motivated as board members. No one joins a board because they love hearing reports. People join a board because they want to make a difference, they want to contribute to an organization or church they love.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY BRUCE JOHNSON:


For ten years, BRUCE JOHNSON has been president of SIM USA, a global mission agency in over 70 countries. At the end of February 2020, he retires from full-time ministry leadership after a 46-year career that spanned multiple organizations, including three stints as an interim CEO.  Also, for nearly a decade Bruce had a full-time consulting practice to ministry and church leaders, NextLevel Leadership, to which he will return. He will continue to work with leaders as a consultant in sifting through issues and bringing clarity to organizational and life direction.  Bruce serves on the board of ECFA and is an elder in his local church.

TO DO TODAY: 
• Select one topic, problem or idea and spend focused time at your next board meeting in open brainstorming to generate ideas for improvement or solutions. It’s not decision-making time; it’s idea-generation time.
• Add generative thinking as a regular part of your board meeting. Try to dedicate one hour or more at each board meeting to generative governance.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, “Lesson 2: Engage Board Members in Generative Thinking.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: On Jan. 22, 2020, 
watch for the commentary by Rick Alvis on Lesson 3, “The Productivity Payoff of Intentional Hospitality. Create hospitable and productive board environments.”





BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

LESSON 1 – Big Blessings Abound When Governance Faithfulness Flourishes

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Wayne Pederson is our guest blogger this week for the first of four lessons in "Part 1: The Powerful Impact of Highly Engaged Boards.”
LESSON 1 OF 40 - Big Blessings Abound When Governance Faithfulness Flourishes
Two stories: “The Board and the Bachelor Farmer” and “$1.5 Billion Worth of Burger Blessings!”


THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: In Lesson 1, the authors note that there should be great joy in serving on an effective, healthy board—and that there is great satisfaction when board members are serving faithfully in their God-given strengths.  

Board faithfulness produces positive outcomes and God’s blessings. And donors are able to discern the effectiveness of a ministry by the faithful stewardship of its board. 

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 1, pages 2-6: 
“Big blessings abound when governance faithfulness and management faithfulness flourish.”
• “It’s very important that we know and leverage the God-given strengths of every board member.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
As I moved into ministry management, my CEO told me that the Governance Committee (the committee that nominates, vets, and selects future board members) is the most important committee of the board. Their decisions will determine the direction, vision, and sustainability of the ministry for the next decade.  

Potential board members should not be pressured to serve. Neither should the selection committee grab on to whoever is available. There must be prayer, discernment, and conversation in the recruitment and selection of new board members.

At the same time…
• if a board member seems not to be in tune with the direction of the ministry, 
• if that person seems always to be taking a contrarian view of board decisions, 
• if that member is consistently the only one who votes no, 
• if the board member is not experiencing joy and passion in board stewardship,
…then the Governance Committee needs to address that concern and make adjustments to that person’s membership. 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY WAYNE PEDERSON:

WAYNE PEDERSON is executive liaison for Far East Broadcasting Company. He has served in Christian broadcasting for over 50 years with Northwestern Media, Moody Broadcasting, National Religious Broadcasters, and HCJB/Reach Beyond. He serves on several boards including ECFA, NRB, The Joshua Fund, and Alliance for the Unreached. He’s married to Willi and they live in beautiful Colorado.

TO DO TODAY: 
Look for agenda items or report items that bring joy, praise, and fulfillment to the board and board members.
• If there’s a board member who appears out of step or shows a negative attitude, create an opportunity to lovingly, but honestly, challenge that individual regarding his or her role.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, “Lesson 1: Big Blessings Abound When Governance Faithfulness Flourishes.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: On Jan. 15, 2020, watch for the commentary by Bruce Johnson on Lesson 2, “Engage Board Members in Generative Thinking. They rely on generative thinking in their day jobs but are rarely asked to think collaboratively in the boardroom.”








BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

LESSON 7 – Eliminate Fuzziness Between Board and Staff Roles

Welcome to  More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog ,  a 40-week journey through the new book,  More Lessons From the Nonprofit Board...