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Wednesday, September 23, 2020

LESSON 38 – Seven Times When a Board Member Should Bid Adieu

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Constantino (Connie) Salios is our guest blogger this week for the third of five lessons in "Part 10: Building a 24/7 Board Culture.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.




LESSON 
38 OF 40 – Seven Times When a Board Member Should Bid Adieu 
Board service is for a season—but it is not forever!

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: Joining a board is often an exciting challenge that can help to accelerate a nonprofit or ministry and provide you with an opportunity to make a significant contribution. But over time many factors can begin to dilute the fit, effectiveness, interest, and energy—and these all could be signals that it might be time to leave the board and offer room for some “fresh air” to enter.

The authors provide seven common reasons why it may be time to move on and resign from the board and they offer a productive checklist for board members to review annually.  As Busby and Pearson remind us in the chapter heading, “board service is for a season—but it is not forever!” 

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 38, pages 202-208: 
• 
“When your passion to serve on the board has left the building, it is time to step off the board.”
 “Joining the board for the wrong reason is one thing—staying on a board after you realize that your motives were improper is something else. Quickly find an exit ramp!
 “If you are serving as the lone dissenting board member—dissenting about the ministry’s direction—or in conflict with other board members or the CEO, your service has effectively ended. Take the right step and resign.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY: 
Knowing when to leave a board is often an easier decision when you know clearly why you joined in the first place. In my experience, boards invite you to join for three primary reasons:  your ability to contribute as a donor, your name and prestige, and your knowledge and potential to contribute with your influence. And usually in that order. 

Resting on top of this foundation should also include your passion for the ministry or nonprofit, your ability to work in collaboration with other board members, a focus on results, and your organizational and governance experience. Now the potential for impact and meaningful service are in place and board service can be enjoyed and productive for all.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY CONSTANTINO (CONNIE) SALIOS:


CONSTANTINO (CONNIE) SALIOS was a co-founder of Kalty Salios (1977), manufacturer’s representatives, and Retail Store Services (1986), a retail merchandising company providing in-store service to over 900 Home Depot stores in the west and southeast regions of the U.S. In 2005, both companies were acquired by Advantage Sales and Marketing, the largest consumer packaged goods sales and merchandising company in North America, to provide their platform for national growth in the home center and hardware retail channels.

Connie completed his graduate studies in Organizational Leadership in 2002 at Biola University and for eight years served as an Adjunct Professor teaching Practical Leadership Theory, Strategy Formulation, and Strategy Implementation.

Connie also served for six years as National Managing Partner of The Barnabas Group—directing the national growth of this ministry that connects the time, talent, touch, and treasure of Christian marketplace leaders with ministry opportunities. 

Currently, Connie informally coaches, consults, and serves on nonprofit boards (Free Wheelchair Mission, Biola Innovation and Entrepreneurship LaunchPad), for-profit boards (Kellogg Garden Supply, HARBRO Emergency and Restoration), and ministry boards (The Barnabas Group, Beachpoint Church).

TO DO TODAY:
• Review board expectations annually, as a best practice, and make timely changes as needed. 
 Complete a personal evaluation annually to make sure you still belong and can make a contribution. 
 And remember that we all have a “shelf life.” Like many of the items in our pantry, the date may have passed or is getting close for us to move on. Celebrate your time on the board, and free up your seat for the next generation. As Dr. Henry Cloud says: “Wise people know when to quit.”
 Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 38, “Seven Times When a Board Member Should Bid Adieu.”


NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On 
Sept. 30, 2020, watch for the commentary by Ed McDowell on Lesson 39, “Identify Your Key Assumptions. An inaccurate premise may lead to a colossal flop!”


BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

LESSON 37 – How Many Board Members Are Present in Your Boardroom?

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Brian Heerwagen is our guest blogger this week for the second of five lessons in "Part 10: Building a 24/7 Board Culture.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.





LESSON 
37 OF 40: How Many Board Members Are Present in Your Boardroom?
It’s more than just answering the roll call.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: In Lesson 37, the authors point out it is difficult for board members to be truly focused and “all in” when they are preoccupied by their own lives and workloads outside the board room. Electronic devices are noticeable distractions, but we also inadvertently create an environment for minds to wander—by having meetings that are too long, happen too frequently, or occur in settings that are not conducive to being focused.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 37, pages 198-201:
Whether it is avoiding technological interruptions or addressing other issues that detract from a focused board meeting, finding a way to maximize the total presence of all board members is vital.
• Minimizing boardroom distractions will maximize meeting impact and enhance the possibility of hearing the still, small voice of the Holy Spirit. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY: 
Board members join the board because they care about the organization and they truly plan on giving their all to the new leadership position. I love to capitalize on those great intentions from the start.  

During recruiting and all the way through orientation, I express genuine gratitude for all they bring to the board with their many gifts and experiences. But I’m also very candid with them that I expect 100 percent focus in how they do their prep work for board meetings as well as how they contribute during board meetings. 

I share these thoughts with them in the following context: as much as they’ll need to give their all to our board at certain times throughout the year, I am fully aware that there are periods of time in-between our board meetings when they will be liberated from such intense focus on our board—allowing them to give their all to other needs. 

I respect that their involvement on our board is a gift, and I recognize upfront that they wear many hats and therefore have many decisions to make about how to spend time and resources. It is good to set boundaries and permissions that are clear and liberating.

If we have 1) the right number of meetings (not too many), 2) provide all the communication and materials ahead of time, and 3) conduct a tight, power-packed agenda each time, then we have the liberty to require their utmost attention at those times. What a joy to harness the energy and leadership of a great board!
 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY BRIAN HEERWAGEN:

BRIAN HEERWAGEN is the CEO of SOE (Standards of Excellence in Short-Term Missions). He has been on countless short-term ministries and has partnered with nationals and long-term missionaries in 29 countries. Brian has also served on boards as a member, vice chair, and chair. He is the lead author of the collaborative work, The Next Mile, Short-Term Missions for the Long Haul, with more than 30,000 books sold. He has also been a church missions pastor for more than 20 years. Brian is married to Lorraine and they have three married daughters and four grandchildren. They live in Portland, Ore.

TO DO TODAY:
• Determine: How many board meetings (how few?) are sufficient, yet will still be power-packed and focused—but without compromising on community and communication?
Inspire: Create an atmosphere of 100 percent focus by encouraging board members to be “all in” in their 1) preparations for the meeting, and 2) while attending the meeting. Then give board members permission to be 100 percent focused on other things when it’s not “our board time.”
Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 37, “How Many Board Members Are Present in Your Boardroom?


NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On 
Sept. 23, 2020, watch for the commentary by Constantino (Connie) Salios on Lesson 38, “Seven Times When a Board Member Should Bid Adieu. Board service is for a season—but it is not forever!”


BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

LESSON 36 - Watch Out for Boards Asleep at the Wheel

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Steve Altick is our guest blogger this week for the first of five lessons in "Part 10: Building a 24/7 Board Culture.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.


LESSON 36 OF 40: Watch Out for Boards Asleep at the Wheel
Golden opportunities are missed when a board’s eyes are wide shut.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: Boards have routines for meetings and board members develop expectations of what the meeting will be like. If meetings do not involve and engage board members, they will succumb to drowsiness and lose motivation to engage in the agenda. So examine your board meeting routines.

Board organization and responsibilities need to be understood and involve all members. If board members are not all on the right page, they may fall asleep. The board leadership is responsible for involving and challenging board members—inspiring them to stay mission-focused, and to stay within the established board policies.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 36, pages 194-197:
• It all starts with recruiting the right board members who understand their role and the policies and procedures that govern the board.
• Board members must learn to focus on the big picture, be insightful and ask for information.
• Boards must understand the difference between operations and oversight, the biblical example of the “hireling” and the shepherd (John 10). Ownership of the ministry is the key to staying awake. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY: 
When I was flying fighter aircraft, your life literally depended on using the checklist. If you were asleep or not focused, it could be serious. One day I missed taking the safety pins out of the ejection seat, which meant if I had needed to eject in an emergency—the seat would not have worked. So after the mission, when I went to put the safety pins in the seat, I realized they had never been removed—a lesson learned!

I recall an organization that recruited new board members from the business community. They had resources needed by the ministry. But with no training and expectations regarding their board roles—they were inattentive to much of the board’s business. Eyes wide shut!

Finally, each board member brings unique gifts and insights to the board team. As a board member, it’s important to understand these unique differences—and to support and participate in whatever the board is discussing. That’s the key to success and staying awake! 
 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY STEVE ALTICK:


STEVE ALTICK served as the CEO at Camp Berachah Ministries (now Black Diamond Camps) for 33 years. He also served in leadership with Christian Camp & Conference Association as sectional president, regional director, and board chair.  He is a Vietnam Veteran with 23 years of service. He remains associated with Black Diamond Camp and is active as a consultant with camps and nonprofits. Steve and his wife, Kathy, reside in Yakima, Wash.

 TO DO TODAY:
• Have your board do a self-evaluation on their actual experience versus their expectations when they first joined the board.
Review past minutes and agendas to evaluate the allocation of “board time” invested in your various agenda items. Are you investing your time appropriately?
Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 36, “Watch Out for Boards Asleep at the Wheel.”


NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On 
Sept. 16, 2020, watch for the commentary by Brian Heerwagen on Lesson 37, “How Many Board Members Are Present in Your Boardroom? It’s more than just answering the roll call.”


BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

LESSON 35 - Leverage the 80/20 Rule in the Boardroom

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Hans Finzel is our guest blogger this week for the fourth of four lessons in "Part 9: Holy Ground and Other Locations.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.


LESSON 35 OF 40: Leverage the 80/20 Rule in the Boardroom
Invest 80 percent of your board work on future ministry opportunities—not rehashing the past.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: 
In Lesson 35, the authors note that most of our time (80%) should be focused on the future, not rehashing the past. Some board members might be tempted to spend too much board meeting time rehashing past failures or roadblocks. It is the job of the board chair and the CEO to make sure that most of the board meetings are devoted to looking forward with trends and opportunities that are around the next corner. 

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 35, pages 185-191: 
Great boards appoint a “Readers Are Leaders” champion—a book zealot who inspires the board to read and discuss at least one future-focused book each year. This practice assures that your board is giving real time to thinking and strategizing about the future. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY: 
The 80/20 rule applies to so many aspects of leadership and organizational health. This chapter embarks on a new application of that principle to board meetings. As the board, we must focus on the future not just spend most of our time micro-managing the past in our rear-view mirrors!

I am a huge fan—like most of us leaders—of the wisdom of Peter Drucker. Long after he has gone on to his reward, he continues to influence so many Christian ministries. As the protectors of the ministry, we on the board have to anticipate the upcoming opportunities and threats that face us. 

Drucker said that systematic innovation includes leveraging seven sources of innovation opportunity. Drucker said to watch for three changes outside of your organizations, including 1) demographics 2) changes in perception, mood, and meaning, and 3) new knowledge. This is the kind of heavy lifting that a board must spend the majority of their time dealing with.

Where does your board spend most of their time? The past? The present or the future? The 80/20 rule is a great way to assure you are managing precious board resources effectively. 

  
THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY 
DR. HANS FINZEL:


DR. HANS FINZEL is a successful author, speaker and trusted authority in the field of leadership. For 20 years he served as President of international non-profit WorldVenture, working in over 65 countries. Hans speaks, writes and teaches practical leadership principles. He has written 11 books, including his international bestseller, The Top Ten Mistakes Leaders Make. Having trained leaders on five continents in his career, his books have been translated into over 25 foreign languages. Today he serves as President of HDLeaders and teaches and speaks globally on all things leadership. 

TO DO TODAY:
• Choose a book that your board will read that is future-focused.
 Study the minutes of your last two board meetings. Analyze how much time was spent looking back and how much looking forward. Make adjustments for your next meeting.
 Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 35, “Leverage the 80/20 Rule in the Boardroom.”


NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On Sept. 9, 2020, watch for the commentary by Steve Altick on Lesson 36, “Watch Out for Boards Asleep at the Wheel. Golden opportunities are missed when a board’s eyes are wide shut.”


BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

LESSON 34 – Five Troublesome Misconceptions of Board Members

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Bart Hadder is our guest blogger this week for the third of four lessons in "Part 9: Holy Ground and Other Locations.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.
LESSON 34 OF 40: Five Troublesome Misconceptions of Board Members
Understanding board member myths can lead to improved governing effectiveness.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: 
In Lesson 34, the authors note that:
• Understanding and addressing misconceptions about board members and their board service can improve the impact and effectiveness of the board.
• Identifying and overcoming misconceptions through board education is an important and ongoing process.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 34, pages 180-184:
• Concerning new board members, the authors quote Michael Anthony: “It was as if the day they were elected to the board, the [CEO] assumed that a mantle of wisdom and discernment came magically on them from on high.”
• “Little or no board experience heightens the importance of board training. Unfortunately, training rarely occurs for ministry board members.”
“Even board members who have served on a ministry board for years may find it challenging to comprehend financial data. Nonprofit financial data is rarely presented to the board in comprehensible form.”

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
It is not uncommon to find people serving as executive directors and CEOs who have had little training for the position or who lack adequate knowledge of nonprofit board best practices and how they should work with their boards. Perhaps even more common are board members who, for the most part, are passionate about the mission of the organization but lack a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities as board members. Consequently, while these organizations may be surviving, they lack the efficiency and effectiveness that they otherwise could experience.

Investing in thoughtful board member recruitment and orientation, including providing a board orientation manual with a clear description of board member roles and responsibilities—and an annual affirmation statement—would clear up many misconceptions right from the start of service.  Also, including ongoing board professional development, either as a regular part of board meetings or some other periodic activity, would help even seasoned boards move their organizations from surviving to flourishing.
  
THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY BART HADDER:


BART HADDER is in the third-third season of life after retiring as a program director for the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust where he served as a program director for many years.  During his time at the Trust, he met with executive directors and their board members to review grant requests from numerous nonprofit organizations, including many Christian ministries.


Currently, Bart is pursuing the opportunities God is providing to capitalize on the knowledge gained from his past experiences to help advance Christian ministries through: counseling organizations on how to approach a foundation; serving as a board coach for the Christian Camp and Conference Association’s Thriving Boards Program and the Murdock COVID Organizational Coaching; and serving as a consultant for the Murdock Trust.  He and his wife, Jackie, recently moved to Boise, Idaho, to be near their two adult children (and mostly to be near their two young grandchildren). 

TO DO TODAY:
• Survey board members to determine what misconceptions might exist regarding their board service.
• Take appropriate steps to address each misconception; i.e. 1) review and improve board member orientation materials and 2) plan for ongoing board training.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 34, “Five Troublesome Misconceptions of Board Members.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On Sept. 2, 2020, watch for the commentary by Hans Finzel on Lesson 35, “Leverage the 80/20 Rule in the Boardroom. Invest 80 percent of your board work on future ministry opportunities—not rehashing the past.”



BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

LESSON 33 – There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#2: Fundraising

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Jos Snoep is our guest blogger this week for the second of four lessons in "Part 9: Holy Ground and Other Locations.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.


LESSON 33 OF 40: There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#2: Fundraising
Flippancy about fundraising is never a good substitute for sincerity.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: 
In Lesson 33, the authors emphasize that fundraising is a fully integrated part of a ministry. It needs to be taken as seriously as any other activity of a nonprofit. The raising of money is ministry and needs to be a noble and vital part of the ministry. 

Fundraising needs to be embedded in a culture of giving. Ministry leaders are culture keepers tasked to define values and behaviors for the organization and consistently communicate that to board, staff and volunteers.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 33, pages 176-179:
• A healthy view on fundraising comes through a definition of the organization’s values and behaviors (culture) in how they relate to biblical stewardship and as an integrated part of the ministry.

• Realize and acknowledge that not everybody involved in the boardroom and your organization has a proper vision on fundraising and stewardship.

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
In 2 Corinthians 8 the church in Macedonia is introduced to us. The churches are tested by severe afflictions, they are very poor. There is a great joy however! In verse 2 their joy shows an overflowing wealth of generosity. An indication is given to us that other churches or leaders did not want them to give as they were begging (verse 4) to be part of the relief of the saints. 

A wrong perspective on fundraising can easily trouble your relationship with and view of (potential) donors. Our own judgment prevails over the vision of the church or person that desires to give. The churches of Macedonia witnessed God’s grace working through their lives and generating a deep love for God’s Kingdom. Their begging was to be part of the Great Commission, of Kingdom work, despite their poverty. Their culture of giving was grounded in God’s grace on their lives (values) and participation in His work (behavior).

The raising of money is serious ministry. You are not asking for money. You are giving others an opportunity to be part of Kingdom work. Are we facilitating or hindering that noble work?
  
THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY JOS SNOEP:


JOS SNOEP is the CEO of Bible League International. He began his nonprofit career in the Netherlands, where he was born and raised. He is married and together they have four children. He started his work at Bible League Netherlands as a fundraiser and accountant and served in various global leadership roles serving local churches with Bibles and training. As CEO of Bible League International, a major part of his role is to share the vision and mission work with individual donors and churches.


TO DO TODAY:
• Continue to educate and repeat the foundations of fundraising to our board of directors.
• Foster a culture of active participation of board members in fundraising and giving.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 33, “There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#2: Fundraising.” 




NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On Aug. 26, 2020, watch for the commentary by Bart Hadder on Lesson 34, “Five Troublesome Misconceptions of Board Members. Understanding board member myths can lead to improved governing effectiveness.”




BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

LESSON 32 – There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#1 Prayer

Welcome to More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Cameron Doolittle is our guest blogger this week for the first of four lessons in "Part 9: Holy Ground and Other Locations.” And during this COVID-19 era, the role of the board becomes even more critical. We pray that your board will have God-honoring wisdom as you spiritually discern next steps.


LESSON 32 OF 40: There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#1 Prayer
“The last one with your thumb up says grace."

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK: 
In Lesson 32, the authors note that when boards gather, they have the chance to invite God into the boardroom—unifying the board’s members, superceding the board’s wisdom, and multiplying the board’s impact—through prayer.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 32, pages 172-175:
Olan Hendrix, founding president of ECFA, once served as an executive search consultant. One of Olan’s ministry clients declined the candidate Olan thought was perfect. The reason? The candidate “made light of prayer.” The experience helped Olan realize the solemnity of the believer communing with God.

Dan and John encourage boards to “Pray: From the beginning to the end of your board meetings—and spontaneously as issues arise—create a praying culture that demonstrates to all that your boardroom is on holy ground.”


MY COLOR COMMENTARY:

The Most Important Asset on Your Balance Sheet. In my work with global givers, I’ve come to know amazing, wise people. None inspire me more than David, who started Australia’s leading Christian foundation. 

I asked him, “What’s your favorite part of your foundation’s grant application you have grantees fill out?” 

“I ask about their prayer strategy.”

David began his career as an accountant. He says, “The greatest asset on your balance sheet is that the God of the universe, the Creator of everything, is on your side. And He makes His power available to your ministry.”

When We Pray, God’s Working. In Ethiopia, my friend Aychi leads a movement that has seen more than 600,000 people baptized, many coming to Jesus out of Muslim backgrounds. On a budget of less than $1 million a year. 

I asked him the key to their outrageous impact. Without hesitation, he said, “Ordinary people praying in extraordinary ways.”

“What do you mean?”

“Well, when we aren’t praying, we’re working. But when we pray, God’s working. So we pray. We all fast every Wednesday. Every two months, we all fast for an additional three days. And every six months, we fast for an additional three days beyond that. We pray until the impossible happens.”

When Aychi’s ministry wants to reach a new area—you guessed it—they start by taking a group of intercessors there to pray.

We know that ministry fruit only comes when we abide in Jesus (John 15:5), and that abiding happens through prayer. What might God decide to do in our ministries if we, as boards, would model the kind of prayer that we want to see in our ministries?  

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY CAMERON DOOLITTLE:


CAMERON DOOLITTLE serves as Senior Director at Maclellan Giving Partners and, through Candle LLC, helps givers become more joyful and ministries become more vibrant. Cameron lives in Waco, Texas, where Carolyn and he raise their four children and serve the college students at Antioch Community Church. Cameron holds degrees from Stanford University and UC-Berkeley (JD/MBA).

His career has spanned writing speeches on Capitol Hill, consulting for hundreds of companies through Corporate Executive Board (since acquired by Gartner Group), and launching Jill's House, a ministry for children with special needs. He is the author of 
Joy Giving: Practical Wisdom from the First Christians and the Global Church

TO DO TODAY:
• Ask your CEO what your ministry’s prayer strategy is.
• Ask your CEO for three specific things they’re asking God to do.
• Visit the ECFA Knowledge Center and read and share the short chapter, Lesson 32, “There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#1 Prayer.”




NEXT WEDNESDAY: 
On Aug. 19, 2020, watch for the commentary by Jos Snoep on Lesson 33, “There Are Two Things You Should Never Joke About—#2: Fundraising. Flippancy about fundraising is never a good substitute for sincerity.”




BULK ORDERS: Click here. For more resources and to download the book's Table of Contents, visit the book's webpage.

LESSON 38 – Seven Times When a Board Member Should Bid Adieu

Welcome to  More Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog ,  a 40-week journey through the new book,  More Lessons From the Nonprofit Board...